The pinups girls of World War II ... they were a soldier's only link to the world they'd left behind, and symbolic of what they were fighting for. The winks and smiles of the World War II pinup have become iconographic, representing a more frolicsome, and certainly a more desperate, time. The World Book Dictionary defines pinup as "1. a picture of a very attractive or famous person, pinned up on a wall, as in a barracks, usually by admirers who have not met the subject. 2. a very attractive girl, especially one considered attractive enough to be the subject of such a picture." The pinup girl became a ubiquitous emblem of wartime America. "She" appeared on the noses of aircraft, submarines, and torpedoes, as well as on calendars, flight jackets, playing cards, and in magazines. It has been said that the pinup was as important to the war effort as Glenn Miller and War Bonds. The war produced thousands of pinups. Here are a just a few of them ...