US FLAG (11 K)

THE CIGARETTE CAMPS (30 K)

INTRODUCTION (4 K)CAMP CHESTERFIELD (5 K)CAMP LUCKY STRIKE (5 K)
CAMP OLD GOLD (5 K)CAMP PHILIP MORRIS (5 K)CAMP TWENTY GRAND (5 K)
CAMP HERBERT TAREYTON (3 K)CAMP PALL MALL (3 K)CAMP HOME RUN (3 K)
CAMP HOME RUN (4 K)MAPS (3 K)BIBLIOGRAPHY (4 K)

HUTS (10 K)

Camp Herbert Tareyton
(Montgeon Forest)

   Montgeon Forest, which is now LeHavre's largest park (see photo below), was the site of Camp Herbert Tareyton. In 1909, this former royal forest, which became the property of M. de Montgeon in 1814, was bought by the City Council and a project was launched to convert the forest into a public park. However, through lack of funds, the only thing that was realized was the building of a wide avenue. During the Second World War , the whole forest was used as a German ammunition depot, and then, following the withdrawal of the Wehrmacht, it became Camp Tareyton.

   Tareyton was built by the U.S. Army engineers of the 89th Infantry Division in 1944, and consisted primarily of prefabricated housing (nearly 3,000 "half-moons" — as the French called the Nissen, Dallas, Tropical Wood, and Tropical Steel huts — were erected). It was named after the famous American illustrator, or — more precisely — after the cigarette brand bearing his name. General Finley was Camp Commander. Following the war, it was used to house displaced citizens of Le Havre whose homes had been razed by Allied bombing and German demolition; some inhabitants lived there up until 1962.


CINEMA (48 K)
Former "Lean's Theater" at Tareyton, 1956


DISPLACED PERSONS (54 K)
Displaced persons living in former American Nissen huts, 1955.


HUTS IN THE FOREST (49 K)
Huts in the forest at Camp Herbert Tareyton, 1945 (picture reprinted courtesy Frédéric Brière).


MONTGEON FOREST TODAY (23 K)
Montgeon Forest, 1999.



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